TICE BCG: Package Insert and Label Information

TICE BCG- bacillus calmette-guerin substrain tice live antigen powder, for suspension
Organon USA Inc.

WARNING

TICE® BCG contains live, attenuated mycobacteria. Because of the potential risk for transmission, prepare, handle, and dispose of TICE® BCG as a biohazard material (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION sections).

BCG infections have been reported in health care workers, primarily from exposures resulting from accidental needle sticks or skin lacerations during the preparation of BCG for administration. Nosocomial infections have been reported in patients receiving parenteral drugs that were prepared in areas in which BCG was reconstituted. BCG is capable of dissemination when administered by the intravesical route, and serious infections, including fatal infections, have been reported in patients receiving intravesical BCG (see WARNINGS, PRECAUTIONS, and ADVERSE REACTIONS sections).

DESCRIPTION

TICE® BCG for intravesical use, is an attenuated, live culture preparation of the Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin (BCG) strain of Mycobacterium bovis. 1 The TICE strain was developed at the University of Illinois from a strain originated at the Pasteur Institute.

The medium in which the BCG organism is grown for preparation of the freeze-dried cake is composed of the following ingredients: glycerin, asparagine, citric acid, potassium phosphate, magnesium sulfate, and iron ammonium citrate. The final preparation prior to freeze drying also contains lactose.

The freeze-dried BCG preparation is delivered in glass vials, each containing 1 to 8 × 108 colony forming units (CFU) of TICE BCG which is equivalent to approximately 50 mg wet weight. Determination of in vitro potency is achieved through colony counts derived from a serial dilution assay. A single dose consists of 1 reconstituted vial (see DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION).

For intravesical use the entire vial is reconstituted with sterile saline. TICE BCG is viable upon reconstitution.

No preservatives have been added.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY

TICE® BCG induces a granulomatous reaction at the local site of administration. Intravesical TICE BCG has been used as a therapy for, and prophylaxis against, recurrent tumors in patients with carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the urinary bladder, and to prevent recurrence of Stage TaT1 papillary tumors of the bladder at high risk of recurrence. The precise mechanism of action is unknown.

CLINICAL STUDIES

Carcinoma in situ (Bladder Cancer)

To evaluate the efficacy of intravesical administration of TICE® BCG in the treatment of carcinoma in situ , patients were identified who had been treated with TICE BCG under 6 different Investigational New Drug (IND) applications in which the most important shared aspect was the use of an induction plus maintenance schedule. Patients received TICE BCG (50 mg; 1 to 8 x 108 CFU) intravesically, once weekly for at least 6 weeks and once monthly thereafter for up to 12 months. A longer maintenance was given in some cases.

The study population consisted of 153 patients, 132 males, 19 females, and 2 unidentified as to gender. Thirty patients lacking baseline documentation of CIS and 4 patients lost to follow-up were not evaluable for treatment response. Therefore, 119 patients were available for efficacy evaluation. The mean age was 69 years (range: 38–97 years).

There were 2 categories of clinical response: (1) Complete Histological Response (CR), defined as complete resolution of carcinoma in situ documented by cystoscopy and cytology, with or without biopsy; and (2) Complete Clinical Response Without Cytology (CRNC), defined as an apparent complete disappearance of tumor upon cystoscopy. The results of a 1987 analysis of the evaluable patients are shown in Table 1.

Table 1: The Response of Patients With CIS Bladder Cancer in 6 IND Studies
Entered Evaluable CR CRNC Overall response
No. (%) of patients 153 119 (78%) 54 (46%) 36 (30%) 90 (76%)

A 1989 update of these data is presented in Table 2. The median duration of follow-up was 47 months.

Table 2: Follow-up Response of Patients With CIS Bladder Cancer in 6 IND Studies
1989 Status of 90 Responders (CR or CRNC)
Response 1987/CR
n=54
1987/CRNC
n=36
1987 Response
n=90
Percent
CR 30 15 45 50
CRNC 0 0 0 0
Unrelated deaths 6 6 12 13
Failure 18 15 33 37

There was no significant difference in response rates between patients with or without prior intravesical chemotherapy. The median duration of response, calculated from the Kaplan-Meier curve as median time to recurrence, is estimated at 4 years or greater. The incidence of cystectomy for 90 patients who achieved a complete response (CR or CRNC) was 11%. The median time to cystectomy in patients who achieved a complete response (CR or CRNC) exceeded 74 months.

TaT1 Bladder Cancer

The efficacy of intravesical TICE BCG in preventing the recurrence of a TaT1 bladder cancer after complete transurethral resection of all papillary tumors was evaluated in 2 open-label, randomized phase III clinical trials. Initial diagnosis of patients included in the studies was determined by cystoscopic biopsies. One was conducted by the Southwestern Oncology Group (SWOG) in patients at high risk of recurrence. High risk was defined as 2 occurrences of tumor within 56 weeks, any stage T1 tumor, or 3 or more tumors presenting simultaneously. The second study was conducted at the Nijmegen University Hospital; Nijmegen, The Netherlands. In this study patients were not selected for high risk of recurrence. In both studies treatment was initiated between 1 and 2 weeks after transurethral resection (TUR).

SWOG Trial (study 8795)

In the SWOG trial (study 8795) patients were randomized to TICE BCG or mitomycin C (MMC). Both drugs were given intravesically weekly for 6 weeks, at 8 and 12 weeks, and then monthly for a total treatment duration of 1 year. Cystoscopy and urinary cytology were performed every 3 months for 2 years. Patients with progressive disease or residual or recurrent disease at or after the 6 month follow-up were removed from the study and were classified as treatment failures.

A total of 469 patients was entered into the study: 237 to the TICE BCG arm and 232 to the MMC arm. Twenty-two patients were subsequently found to be ineligible, and 66 patients had concurrent CIS, and were analyzed separately. Four patients were lost to follow-up, leaving 191 evaluable patients in the TICE BCG arm and 186 in the MMC arm. Of the patients, 84% were male and 16% were female. The average age of these patients was 65 years old.

The Kaplan-Meier estimates of 2-year disease-free survival are shown in Table 3. The difference in disease-free survival time between the 2 groups was statistically significant by the log rank test (P =0.03). The 95% confidence interval of the difference in 2-year disease-free survival was 12% ± 10%. No statistically significant differences between the groups were noted in time to tumor progression, tumor invasion, or overall survival.

Table 3: Results of SWOG Study 8795
TICE BCG Arm
N=191
MMC Arm
N=186
Estimated disease-free survival at 2 years 57% 45%
95% Confidence Interval (CI) (50%, 65%) (38%, 53%)

Nijmegen Study

In the Nijmegen study, the efficacy of 3 treatments was compared: TICE substrain BCG, Rijksinstituut voor Volksgezondheid en Milieuhygiene substrain BCG (BCG-RIVM), and MMC.

TICE BCG and BCG-RIVM were given intravesically weekly for 6 weeks. In contrast to the SWOG study, maintenance BCG was not given. Mitomycin C was given intravesically weekly for 4 weeks and then monthly for a total duration of treatment of 6 months. Cystoscopy and urinary cytology were performed every 3 months until recurrence.

A total of 469 patients was enrolled and randomized. Thirty-two patients were not evaluable, 17 were ineligible, 15 were withdrawn before treatment, and 50 had concurrent CIS and were analyzed separately, leaving 387 evaluable patients: 117 in the TICE BCG arm, 134 in the BCG-RIVM arm, and 136 in the MMC arm. Twenty-eight patients (24%) in the TICE BCG arm, 32 patients (24%) in the BCG-RIVM arm, and 24 patients (18%) in the MMC arm had TaG1 tumors. The median duration of follow-up was 22 months (range: 3–54 months).

The Kaplan-Meier estimates of 2-year disease-free survival are shown in Table 4. The differences in disease-free survival among the 3 arms were not statistically significant by the log-rank test (P =0.08).

Table 4: Results of Nijmegen Study
TICE BCG Arm
N=117
BCG-RIVM Arm
N=134
MMC Arm
N=136
Estimated disease-free survival at 2 years 53% 62% 64%
95% Confidence Interval (CI) (44%, 64%) (53%, 72%) (55%, 74%)

In both the SWOG 8795 study and the Nijmegen study, acute toxicity was more common, and usually more severe, with TICE BCG than with MMC (see ADVERSE REACTIONS).

TICE BCG Indications and Usage

TICE® BCG is indicated for:

  • the treatment and prophylaxis of carcinoma in situ (CIS) of the urinary bladder
  • the prophylaxis of primary or recurrent stage Ta and/or T1 papillary tumors following transurethral resection (TUR)

Limitations of Use:

  • TICE BCG is not recommended for stage TaG1 papillary tumors, unless they are judged to be at high risk of tumor recurrence.
  • TICE BCG is not indicated for papillary tumors of stages higher than T1.

CONTRAINDICATIONS

Immunosuppressed Patients

TICE® BCG should not be used in immunosuppressed patients with congenital or acquired immune deficiencies, whether due to concurrent disease (e.g., AIDS, leukemia, lymphoma) cancer therapy (e.g., cytotoxic drugs, radiation), or immunosuppressive therapy (e.g., corticosteroids).

Patients with Increased Risk of BCG Infection

Treatment should be postponed until resolution of a concurrent febrile illness, urinary tract infection, or gross hematuria. Seven to 14 days should elapse before BCG is administered following biopsy, TUR, or traumatic catheterization.

Active Tuberculosis

TICE BCG should not be administered to persons with active tuberculosis. Active tuberculosis should be ruled out in individuals who are PPD positive before starting treatment with TICE BCG.

WARNINGS

BCG LIVE (TICE® BCG) is not a vaccine for the prevention of cancer. BCG Vaccine, not BCG LIVE (TICE BCG), should be used for the prevention of tuberculosis. For vaccination use, refer to BCG Vaccine prescribing information.

Handling Precautions

TICE BCG is an infectious agent. Physicians using this product should be familiar with the literature on the prevention and treatment of BCG-related complications, and should be prepared in such emergencies to contact an infectious disease specialist with experience in treating the infectious complications of intravesical BCG. The treatment of the infectious complications of BCG requires long-term, multiple-drug antibiotic therapy. Special culture media are required for mycobacteria, and physicians administering intravesical BCG or those caring for these patients should have these media readily available.

BCG Infection

Instillation of TICE BCG with an actively bleeding mucosa may promote systemic BCG infection. Treatment should be postponed for at least 1 week following transurethral resection, biopsy, traumatic catheterization, or gross hematuria.

Systemic BCG Reaction

Deaths have been reported as a result of systemic BCG infection and sepsis.2,3 Patients should be monitored for the presence of symptoms and signs of toxicity after each intravesical treatment. Febrile episodes with flu-like symptoms lasting more than 72 hours, fever ≥103°F, systemic manifestations increasing in intensity with repeated instillations, or persistent abnormalities of liver function tests suggest systemic BCG infection and may require antituberculous therapy. Local symptoms (prostatitis, epididymitis, orchitis) lasting more than 2 to 3 days may also suggest active infection (see WARNINGS, Management of Serious BCG Complications section).

Laboratory Tests

The use of TICE BCG may cause tuberculin sensitivity. Since this is a valuable aid in the diagnosis of tuberculosis, it is advisable to determine the tuberculin reactivity by PPD skin testing before treatment.

Antimicrobial Therapy

Intravesical instillations of BCG should be postponed during treatment with antibiotics, since antimicrobial therapy may interfere with the effectiveness of TICE BCG (see PRECAUTIONS). TICE BCG should not be used in individuals with concurrent infections.

Bladder Capacity

Small bladder capacity has been associated with increased risk of severe local reactions and should be considered in deciding to use TICE BCG therapy.

Management of Serious BCG Complications

Acute, localized irritative toxicities of TICE BCG may be accompanied by systemic manifestations, consistent with a “flu-like” syndrome. Systemic adverse effects of 1 to 2 days’ duration such as malaise, fever, and chills often reflect hypersensitivity reactions. However, symptoms such as fever of38.5°C (101.3°F), or acute localized inflammation such as epididymitis, prostatitis, or orchitis persisting longer than 2 to 3 days suggest active infection, and evaluation for serious infectious complication should be considered.

In patients who develop persistent fever or experience an acute febrile illness consistent with BCG infection, 2 or more antimycobacterial agents should be administered while diagnostic evaluation, including cultures, is conducted. BCG treatment should be discontinued. Negative cultures do not necessarily rule out infection. Physicians using this product should be familiar with the literature on prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of BCG-related complications and, when appropriate, should consult an infectious disease specialist or other physician with experience in the diagnosis and treatment of mycobacterial infections.

TICE BCG is sensitive to the most commonly used antituberculous agents (isoniazid, rifampin, and ethambutol). TICE BCG is not sensitive to pyrazinamide.

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