Sertraline Hydrochloride: Package Insert and Label Information

SERTRALINE HYDROCHLORIDE- sertraline hydrochloride tablet, film coated
NuCare Pharmaceuticals,Inc.

WARNING: SUICIDAL THOUGHTS AND BEHAVIORS

Antidepressants increased the risk of suicidal thoughts and behavior in pediatric and young adult patients in short-term studies. Closely monitor all antidepressant-treated patients for clinical worsening, and for emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors [See Warnings and Precautions (5.1)].

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Sertraline hydrochloride tablets are indicated for the treatment of the following [See Clinical Studies (14)] :

  • Major depressive disorder (MDD)
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Panic disorder (PD)
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Social anxiety disorder (SAD)
  • Premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD)

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 Dosage in Patients with MDD, OCD, PD, PTSD, and SAD

The recommended initial dosage and maximum sertraline hydrochloride dosage in patients with MDD, OCD, PD, PTSD, and SAD are displayed in Table 1 below. A dosage of 25 mg or 50 mg per day is the initial therapeutic dosage.

For adults and pediatric patients, subsequent dosages may be increased in case of an inadequate response in 25 to 50 mg per day increments once a week, depending on tolerability, up to a maximum of 200 mg per day. Given the 24-hour elimination half-life of sertraline hydrochloride, the recommended interval between dose changes is one week.

Table 1: Recommended Daily Dosage of Sertraline Hydrochloride in Patients with MDD, OCD, PD, PTSD, and SAD
Indication Starting Dose Therapeutic Range
Adults
MDD 50 mg 50 to 200 mg
OCD 50 mg
PD, PTSD, SAD 25 mg
Pediatric Patients
OCD (ages 6 to 12 years old) 25 mg 50 to 200 mg
OCD (ages 13 to 17 years old) 50 mg

2.2 Dosage in Patients with PMDD

The recommended starting sertraline hydrochloride dosage in adult women with PMDD is 50 mg per day. Sertraline hydrochloride may be administered either continuously (every day throughout the menstrual cycle) or intermittently (only during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle, i.e., starting the daily dosage 14 days prior to the anticipated onset of menstruation and continuing through the onset of menses). Intermittent dosing would be repeated with each new cycle.

  • When dosing continuously, patients not responding to a 50 mg dosage may benefit from dosage increases at 50 mg increments per menstrual cycle up to 150 mg per day.
  • When dosing intermittently, patients not responding to a 50 mg dosage may benefit from increasing the dosage up to a maximum of 100 mg per day during the next menstrual cycle (and subsequent cycles) as follows: 50 mg per day during the first 3 days of dosing followed by 100 mg per day during the remaining days in the dosing cycle.

2.3 Screen for Bipolar Disorder Prior to Starting Sertraline Hydrochloride Tablets

Prior to initiating treatment with sertraline hydrochloride tablets or another antidepressant, screen patients for a personal or family history of bipolar disorder, mania, or hypomania [See Warnings and Precautions (5.4)].

2.4 Dosage Modifications in Patients with Hepatic Impairment

Both the recommended starting dosage and therapeutic range in patients with mild hepatic impairment (Child Pugh scores 5 or 6) are half the recommended daily dosage [See Dosage and Administration (2.1, 2.2)]. The use of sertraline hydrochloride tablets in patients with moderate (Child Pugh scores 7 to 9) or severe hepatic impairment (Child Pugh scores 10 to 15) is not recommended [See Use in Specific Populations (8.6), Clinical Pharmacology (12.3)].

2.5 Switching Patients to or from a Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitor Antidepressant

At least 14 days must elapse between discontinuation of a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI) antidepressant and initiation of sertraline hydrochloride tablets. In addition, at least 14 days must elapse after stopping sertraline hydrochloride tablets before starting an MAOI antidepressant [See Contraindications (4), Warnings and Precautions (5.2)].

2.6 Discontinuation of Treatment with Sertraline Hydrochloride Tablets

Adverse reactions may occur upon discontinuation of sertraline hydrochloride tablets [See Warnings and Precautions (5.5)]. Gradually reduce the dosage rather than stopping sertraline hydrochloride tablets abruptly whenever possible.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Sertraline Hydrochloride Tablets USP, 25 mg are green colored, biconvex, capsule shaped film coated tablets debossed with ‘A’ on one side and with a score line in between ‘1’ and ‘6’ on the other side.

Sertraline Hydrochloride Tablets USP, 50 mg are blue colored, biconvex, capsule shaped film coated tablets debossed with ‘A’ on one side and with a score line in between ‘1’ and ‘7’ on the other side.

Sertraline Hydrochloride Tablets USP, 100 mg are yellow colored, biconvex, capsule shaped film coated tablets debossed with ‘A’ on one side and with a score line in between ‘1’ and ‘8’ on the other side.

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

Sertraline hydrochloride tablets are contraindicated in patients:

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Suicidal Thoughts and Behaviors in Pediatric and Young Adult Patients

In pooled analyses of placebo-controlled trials of antidepressant drugs (SSRIs and other antidepressant classes) that included approximately 77,000 adult patients and over 4,400 pediatric patients, the incidence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in pediatric and young adult patients was greater in antidepressant-treated patients than in placebo-treated patients. The drug-placebo differences in the number of cases of suicidal thoughts and behaviors per 1000 patients treated are provided in Table 2.
No suicides occurred in any of the pediatric studies. There were suicides in the adult studies, but the number was not sufficient to reach any conclusion about antidepressant drug effect on suicide.

Table 2: Risk Differences of the Number of Cases of Suicidal Thoughts or Behaviors in the Pooled Placebo-Controlled Trials of Antidepressants in Pediatric and Adult Patients
Age Range (years) Drug-Placebo Difference in Number of Patients of Suicidal Thoughts or Behaviors per 1000 Patients Treated
Increases Compared to Placebo
<18 14 additional patients
18 to 24 5 additional patients
Decreases Compared to Placebo
25 to 64 1 fewer patient
≥65 6 fewer patients

It is unknown whether the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in pediatric and young adult patients extends to longer-term use, i.e., beyond four months. However, there is substantial evidence from placebo-controlled maintenance trials in adults with MDD that antidepressants delay the recurrence of depression.
Monitor all antidepressant-treated patients for clinical worsening and emergence of suicidal thoughts and behaviors, especially during the initial few months of drug therapy and at times of dosage changes. Counsel family members or caregivers of patients to monitor for changes in behavior and to alert the healthcare provider. Consider changing the therapeutic regimen, including possibly discontinuing sertraline hydrochloride, in patients whose depression is persistently worse, or who are experiencing emergent suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

5.2 Serotonin Syndrome

Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), including sertraline hydrochloride, can precipitate serotonin syndrome, a potentially life-threatening condition. The risk is increased with concomitant use of other serotonergic drugs (including triptans, tricyclic antidepressants, fentanyl, lithium, tramadol, tryptophan, buspirone, amphetamines, and St. John’s Wort) and with drugs that impair metabolism of serotonin, i.e., MAOIs [See Contraindications (4), Drug Interactions (7.1)]. Serotonin syndrome can also occur when these drugs are used alone.
Serotonin syndrome signs and symptoms may include mental status changes (e.g., agitation, hallucinations, delirium, and coma), autonomic instability (e.g., tachycardia, labile blood pressure, dizziness, diaphoresis, flushing, hyperthermia), neuromuscular symptoms (e.g., tremor, rigidity, myoclonus, hyperreflexia, incoordination), seizures, and gastrointestinal symptoms (e.g., nausea, vomiting, diarrhea).
The concomitant use of sertraline hydrochloride with MAOIs is contraindicated. In addition, do not initiate sertraline hydrochloride in a patient being treated with MAOIs such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue. No reports involved the administration of methylene blue by other routes (such as oral tablets or local tissue injection). If it is necessary to initiate treatment with an MAOI such as linezolid or intravenous methylene blue in a patient taking sertraline hydrochloride tablets, discontinue sertraline hydrochloride tablets before initiating treatment with the MAOI [See Contraindications (4), Drug Interactions (7.1)].

Monitor all patients taking sertraline hydrochloride for the emergence of serotonin syndrome. Discontinue treatment with sertraline hydrochloride and any concomitant serotonergic agents immediately if the above symptoms occur, and initiate supportive symptomatic treatment. If concomitant use of sertraline hydrochloride with other serotonergic drugs is clinically warranted, inform patients of the increased risk for serotonin syndrome and monitor for symptoms.

5.3 Increased Risk of Bleeding

Drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake inhibition, including sertraline hydrochloride, increase the risk of bleeding events. Concomitant use of aspirin, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), other antiplatelet drugs, warfarin, and other anticoagulants may add to this risk. Case reports and epidemiological studies (case-control and cohort design) have demonstrated an association between use of drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake and the occurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. Bleeding events related to drugs that interfere with serotonin reuptake have ranged from ecchymosis, hematoma, epistaxis, and petechiae to life-threatening hemorrhages.
Inform patients of the increased risk of bleeding associated with the concomitant use of sertraline hydrochloride and antiplatelet agents or anticoagulants. For patients taking warfarin, carefully monitor the international normalized ratio.

5.4 Activation of Mania or Hypomania

In patients with bipolar disorder, treating a depressive episode with sertraline hydrochloride or another antidepressant may precipitate a mixed/manic episode. In controlled clinical trials, patients with bipolar disorder were generally excluded; however, symptoms of mania or hypomania were reported in 0.4% of patients treated with sertraline hydrochloride. Prior to initiating treatment with sertraline hydrochloride, screen patients for any personal or family history of bipolar disorder, mania, or hypomania.

5.5 Discontinuation Syndrome

Adverse reactions after discontinuation of serotonergic antidepressants, particularly after abrupt discontinuation, include: nausea, sweating, dysphoric mood, irritability, agitation, dizziness, sensory disturbances (e.g., paresthesia, such as electric shock sensations), tremor, anxiety, confusion, headache, lethargy, emotional lability, insomnia, hypomania, tinnitus, and seizures. A gradual reduction in dosage rather than abrupt cessation is recommended whenever possible [See Dosage and Administration (2.6)].

5.6 Seizures

Sertraline hydrochloride has not been systematically evaluated in patients with seizure disorders. Patients with a history of seizures were excluded from clinical studies. Sertraline hydrochloride should be prescribed with caution in patients with a seizure disorder.

5.7 Angle-Closure Glaucoma

The pupillary dilation that occurs following use of many antidepressant drugs including sertraline hydrochloride may trigger an angle closure attack in a patient with anatomically narrow angles who does not have a patent iridectomy. Avoid use of antidepressants, including sertraline hydrochloride, in patients with untreated anatomically narrow angles.

5.8 Hyponatremia

Hyponatremia may occur as a result of treatment with SNRIs and SSRIs, including sertraline hydrochloride. Cases with serum sodium lower than 110 mmol/L have been reported. Signs and symptoms of hyponatremia include headache, difficulty concentrating, memory impairment, confusion, weakness, and unsteadiness, which may lead to falls. Signs and symptoms associated with more severe or acute cases have included hallucination, syncope, seizure, coma, respiratory arrest, and death. In many cases, this hyponatremia appears to be the result of the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH).
In patients with symptomatic hyponatremia, discontinue sertraline hydrochloride and institute appropriate medical intervention. Elderly patients, patients taking diuretics, and those who are volume-depleted may be at greater risk of developing hyponatremia with SSRIs and SNRIs [See Use in Specific Populations (8.5)] .

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