PANTOPRAZOLE SODIUM DELAYED RELEASE: Package Insert and Label Information

PANTOPRAZOLE SODIUM DELAYED RELEASE- pantoprazole sodium tablet, delayed release
STAT RX USA LLC

1 INDICATIONS AND USAGE

Pantoprazole sodium delayed-release tablets are indicated for:

1.1 Short-Term Treatment of Erosive Esophagitis Associated With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD)

Pantoprazole sodium delayed-release tablets are indicated in adults and pediatric patients five years of age and older for the short-term treatment (up to 8 weeks) in the healing and symptomatic relief of erosive esophagitis. For those adult patients who have not healed after 8 weeks of treatment, an additional 8-week course of pantoprazole sodium may be considered. Safety of treatment beyond 8 weeks in pediatric patients has not been established.

1.2 Maintenance of Healing of Erosive Esophagitis

Pantoprazole sodium delayed-release tablets are indicated for maintenance of healing of erosive esophagitis and reduction in relapse rates of daytime and nighttime heartburn symptoms in adult patients with GERD. Controlled studies did not extend beyond 12 months.

1.3 Pathological Hypersecretory Conditions Including Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

Pantoprazole sodium delayed-release tablets are indicated for the long-term treatment of pathological hypersecretory conditions, including Zollinger-Ellison syndrome.

2 DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

2.1 Recommended Dosing Schedule

Pantoprazole sodium is supplied as delayed-release tablets. The recommended dosages are outlined in Table 1.

Table 1: Recommended Dosing Schedule for Pantoprazole Sodium Delayed-Release Tablets
Indication Dose Frequency
* For adult patients who have not healed after 8 weeks of treatment, an additional 8-week course of pantoprazole sodium may be considered.

** Dosage regimens should be adjusted to individual patient needs and should continue for as long as clinically indicated. Doses up to 240 mg daily have been administered.

Short-Term Treatment of Erosive Esophagitis Associated With GERD
Adults 40 mg Once daily for up to 8 weeks*
Children (5 years and older)
≥ 15 kg to < 40 kg 20 mg Once daily for up to 8 weeks
≥ 40 kg 40 mg
Maintenance of Healing of Erosive Esophagitis
Adults 40 mg Once daily
Pathological Hypersecretory Conditions Including Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome
Adults 40 mg Twice daily**

2.2 Administration Instructions

Directions for method of administration for each dosage form are presented in Table 2.

Table 2: Administration Instructions
Formulation Route Instructions*
* Patients should be cautioned that Pantoprazole Sodium Delayed-Release Tablets should not be split, chewed, or crushed.
Delayed-Release Tablets Oral Swallowed whole, with or without food

Pantoprazole Sodium Delayed-Release Tablets

Pantoprazole sodium delayed-release tablets should be swallowed whole, with or without food in the stomach. If patients are unable to swallow a 40 mg tablet, two 20 mg tablets may be taken. Concomitant administration of antacids does not affect the absorption of pantoprazole sodium delayed-release tablets.

3 DOSAGE FORMS AND STRENGTHS

Delayed-Release Tablets:

  • 40 mg, yellow oval biconvex tablets imprinted with PROTONIX (brown ink) on one side
  • 20 mg, yellow oval biconvex tablets imprinted with P20 (brown ink) on one side

4 CONTRAINDICATIONS

Pantoprazole sodium delayed-release tablets are contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to any component of the formulation [see Description ( 11) ] or any substituted benzimidazole.

5 WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS

5.1 Concurrent Gastric Malignancy

Symptomatic response to therapy with pantoprazole sodium does not preclude the presence of gastric malignancy.

5.2 Atrophic Gastritis

Atrophic gastritis has been noted occasionally in gastric corpus biopsies from patients treated long-term with pantoprazole sodium, particularly in patients who were H. pylori positive.

5.3 Cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B-12) Deficiency

Generally, daily treatment with any acid-suppressing medications over a long period of time (e.g., longer than 3 years) may lead to malabsorption of cyanocobalamin (Vitamin B-12) caused by hypo- or achlorhydria. Rare reports of cyanocobalamin deficiency occurring with acid-suppressing therapy have been reported in the literature. This diagnosis should be considered if clinical symptoms consistent with cyanocobalamin deficiency are observed.

5.4 Tumorigenicity

Due to the chronic nature of GERD, there may be a potential for prolonged administration of pantoprazole sodium. In long-term rodent studies, pantoprazole sodium was carcinogenic and caused rare types of gastrointestinal tumors. The relevance of these findings to tumor development in humans is unknown [see Nonclinical Toxicology ( 13.1) ].

5.5 Interference with Urine Screen for THC

See Drug Interactions ( 7.4).

6 ADVERSE REACTIONS

6.1 Clinical Trial Experience

Because clinical trials are conducted under widely varying conditions, adverse reaction rates observed in the clinical trials of a drug cannot be directly compared to rates in the clinical trials of another drug and may not reflect the rates observed in clinical practice.

Adults

Safety in nine randomized comparative US clinical trials in patients with GERD included 1,473 patients on oral pantoprazole sodium (20 mg or 40 mg), 299 patients on an H2 -receptor antagonist, 46 patients on another proton pump inhibitor, and 82 patients on placebo. The most frequently occurring adverse reactions are listed in Table 3.

Table 3: Adverse Reactions Reported in Clinical Trials of Adult Patients with GERD at a Frequency of > 2%
Pantoprazole sodium(n=1473)% Comparators(n=345)% Placebo(n=82)%
HeadacheDiarrheaNauseaAbdominal painVomitingFlatulenceDizzinessArthralgia 12.28.87.06.24.33.93.02.8 12.89.65.24.13.52.92.91.4 8.54.99.86.12.43.71.21.2

Additional adverse reactions that were reported for pantoprazole sodium in clinical trials with a frequency of ≤ 2% are listed below by body system:

Body as a Whole: allergic reaction, pyrexia, photosensitivity reaction, facial edema

Gastrointestinal: constipation, dry mouth, hepatitis

Hematologic: leukopenia, thrombocytopenia

Metabolic/Nutritional: elevated CK (creatine kinase), generalized edema, elevated triglycerides, liver enzymes elevated

Musculoskeletal: myalgia

Nervous: depression, vertigo

Skin and Appendages: urticaria, rash, pruritus

Special Senses: blurred vision

Pediatric Patients

Safety of pantoprazole sodium in the treatment of Erosive Esophagitis (EE) associated with GERD was evaluated in pediatric patients ages 1 year through 16 years in three clinical trials. Safety trials involved pediatric patients with EE; however, as EE is uncommon in the pediatric population, 249 pediatric patients with endoscopically-proven or symptomatic GERD were also evaluated. All adult adverse reactions to pantoprazole sodium are considered relevant to pediatric patients. In patients ages 1 year through 16 years, the most commonly reported (> 4%) adverse reactions include: URI, headache, fever, diarrhea, vomiting, rash, and abdominal pain.

For safety information in patients less than 1 year of age see Use in Specific Populations ( 8.4).

Additional adverse reactions that were reported for pantoprazole sodium in pediatric patients in clinical trials with a frequency of ≤ 4% are listed below by body system:

Body as a Whole: allergic reaction, facial edema

Gastrointestinal: constipation, flatulence, nausea

Metabolic/Nutritional: elevated triglycerides, elevated liver enzymes, elevated CK (creatine kinase)

Musculoskeletal: arthralgia, myalgia

Nervous: dizziness, vertigo

Skin and Appendages: urticaria

The following adverse reactions seen in adults in clinical trials were not reported in pediatric patients in clinical trials, but are considered relevant to pediatric patients: photosensitivity reaction, dry mouth, hepatitis, thrombocytopenia, generalized edema, depression, pruritus, leukopenia, and blurred vision.

Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome

In clinical studies of Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome, adverse reactions reported in 35 patients taking pantoprazole sodium 80 mg/day to 240 mg/day for up to 2 years were similar to those reported in adult patients with GERD.

6.2 Postmarketing Experience

The following adverse reactions have been identified during postapproval use of pantoprazole sodium. Because these reactions are reported voluntarily from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

These adverse reactions are listed below by body system:

Immune System Disorders: anaphylaxis (including anaphylactic shock)

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: severe dermatologic reactions (some fatal), including erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN, some fatal), and angioedema (Quincke’s edema)

Musculoskeletal Disorders: rhabdomyolysis

Renal and Urinary Disorders: interstitial nephritis

Hepatobiliary Disorders: hepatocellular damage leading to jaundice and hepatic failure

Psychiatric Disorders: hallucination, confusion

7 DRUG INTERACTIONS

7.1 Interference with Antiretroviral Therapy

Concomitant use of atazanavir or nelfinavir with proton pump inhibitors is not recommended. Coadministration of atazanavir or nelfinavir with proton pump inhibitors is expected to substantially decrease atazanavir or nelfinavir plasma concentrations and may result in a loss of therapeutic effect and development of drug resistance.

7.2 Coumarin Anticoagulants

There have been postmarketing reports of increased INR and prothrombin time in patients receiving proton pump inhibitors, including pantoprazole sodium, and warfarin concomitantly. Increases in INR and prothrombin time may lead to abnormal bleeding and even death. Patients treated with proton pump inhibitors and warfarin concomitantly should be monitored for increases in INR and prothrombin time.

7.3 Drugs for Which Gastric pH Can Affect Bioavailability

Pantoprazole sodium causes long-lasting inhibition of gastric acid secretion. Therefore, pantoprazole sodium may interfere with absorption of drugs where gastric pH is an important determinant of their bioavailability (e.g., ketoconazole, ampicillin esters, and iron salts).

7.4 False Positive Urine Tests for THC

There have been reports of false positive urine screening tests for tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in patients receiving proton pump inhibitors. An alternative confirmatory method should be considered to verify positive results.

8 USE IN SPECIFIC POPULATIONS

8.1 Pregnancy

Teratogenic Effects

Pregnancy Category B

Reproduction studies have been performed in rats at oral doses up to 88 times the recommended human dose and in rabbits at oral doses up to 16 times the recommended human dose and have revealed no evidence of impaired fertility or harm to the fetus due to pantoprazole sodium. There are, however, no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Because animal reproduction studies are not always predictive of human response, this drug should be used during pregnancy only if clearly needed [see Nonclinical Toxicology ( 13.2) ].

8.3 Nursing Mothers

Pantoprazole sodium and its metabolites are excreted in the milk of rats. Pantoprazole sodium excretion in human milk has been detected in a study of a single nursing mother after a single 40 mg oral dose. The clinical relevance of this finding is not known. Many drugs which are excreted in human milk have a potential for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants. Based on the potential for tumorigenicity shown for pantoprazole sodium in rodent carcinogenicity studies, a decision should be made whether to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into account the benefit of the drug to the mother.

8.4 Pediatric Use

The safety and effectiveness of pantoprazole sodium for short-term treatment (up to eight weeks) of erosive esophagitis (EE) associated with GERD have been established in pediatric patients 1 year through 16 years of age. Effectiveness for EE has not been demonstrated in patients less than 1 year of age. In addition, for patients less than 5 years of age, there is no appropriate dosage strength in an age-appropriate formulation available. Therefore, pantoprazole sodium is indicated for the short-term treatment of EE associated with GERD for patients 5 years and older. The safety and effectiveness of pantoprazole sodium for pediatric uses other than EE have not been established.

1 year through 16 years of age

Use of pantoprazole sodium in pediatric patients 1 year through 16 years of age for short-term treatment (up to eight weeks) of EE associated with GERD is supported by: a) extrapolation of results from adequate and well-controlled studies that supported the approval of pantoprazole sodium for treatment of EE associated with GERD in adults, and b) safety, effectiveness, and pharmacokinetic studies performed in pediatric patients [see Clinical Studies ( 14.1), and Clinical Pharmacology ( 12.3) ].

Safety of pantoprazole sodium in the treatment of EE associated with GERD in pediatric patients 1 through 16 years of age was evaluated in three multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-treatment studies, involving 249 pediatric patients, including 8 with EE (4 patients ages 1 year to 5 years and 4 patients 5 years to 11 years). The children ages 1 year to 5 years with endoscopically diagnosed EE (defined as an endoscopic Hetzel-Dent score ≥ 2) were treated once daily for 8 weeks with one of two dose levels of pantoprazole sodium (approximating 0.6 mg/kg or 1.2 mg/kg). All 4 of these patients with EE were healed (Hetzel‑Dent score of 0 or 1) at 8 weeks. Because EE is uncommon in the pediatric population, predominantly pediatric patients with endoscopically-proven or symptomatic GERD were also included in these studies. Patients were treated with a range of doses of pantoprazole sodium once daily for 8 weeks. For safety findings see Adverse Reactions ( 6.1). Because these pediatric trials had no placebo, active comparator, or evidence of a dose response, the trials were inconclusive regarding the clinical benefit of pantoprazole sodium for symptomatic GERD in the pediatric population. The effectiveness of pantoprazole sodium for treating symptomatic GERD in pediatric patients has not been established.

Although the data from the clinical trials support use of pantoprazole sodium for the short-term treatment of EE associated with GERD in pediatric patients 1 year through 5 years, there is no commercially available dosage formulation appropriate for patients less than 5 years of age [see Dosage and Administration ( 2) ].

In a population pharmacokinetic analysis, clearance values in the children 1 to 5 years old with endoscopically proven GERD had a median value of 2.4 L/h. Following a 1.2 mg/kg equivalent dose (15 mg for ≤ 12.5 kg and 20 mg for > 12.5 to < 25 kg), the plasma concentrations of pantoprazole sodium were highly variable and the median time to peak plasma concentration was 3 to 6 hours. The estimated AUC for patients 1 to 5 years old was 37% higher than for adults receiving a single 40 mg tablet, with a geometric mean AUC value of 6.8 µg•hr/mL.

Neonates to less than one year of age

Pantoprazole sodium was not found to be effective in a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, treatment-withdrawal study of 129 pediatric patients 1 through 11 months of age. Patients were enrolled if they had symptomatic GERD based on medical history and had not responded to non-pharmacologic interventions for GERD for two weeks. Patients received pantoprazole sodium daily for four weeks in an open-label phase, then patients were randomized in equal proportion to receive pantoprazole sodium treatment or placebo for the subsequent four weeks in a double-blind manner. Efficacy was assessed by observing the time from randomization to study discontinuation due to symptom worsening during the four-week treatment-withdrawal phase. There was no statistically significant difference between pantoprazole sodium and placebo in the rate of discontinuation.

In this trial, the adverse reactions that were reported more commonly (difference of ≥ 4%) in the treated population compared to the placebo population were elevated CK, otitis media, rhinitis, and laryngitis.

In a population pharmacokinetic analysis, the systemic exposure was higher in patients less than 1 year of age with GERD compared to adults who received a single 40 mg dose (geometric mean AUC was 103% higher in preterm infants and neonates receiving single dose of 2.5 mg of pantoprazole sodium, and 23% higher in infants 1 through 11 months of age receiving a single dose of approximately 1.2 mg/kg). In these patients, the apparent clearance (CL/F) increased with age (median clearance: 0.6 L/hr, range: 0.03 to 3.2 L/hr).

These doses resulted in pharmacodynamic effects on gastric but not esophageal pH. Following once daily dosing of 2.5 mg of pantoprazole sodium in preterm infants and neonates, there was an increase in the mean gastric pH (from 4.3 at baseline to 5.2 at steady-state) and in the mean % time that gastric pH was > 4 (from 60% at baseline to 80% at steady-state). Following once daily dosing of approximately 1.2 mg/kg of pantoprazole sodium in infants 1 through 11 months of age, there was an increase in the mean gastric pH (from 3.1 at baseline to 4.2 at steady-state) and in the mean % time that gastric pH was > 4 (from 32% at baseline to 60% at steady-state). However, no significant changes were observed in mean intraesophageal pH or % time that esophageal pH was < 4 in either age group.

Because pantoprazole sodium was not shown to be effective in the randomized, placebo-controlled study in this age group, the use of pantoprazole sodium for treatment of symptomatic GERD in infants less than 1 year of age is not indicated.

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