NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE: Package Insert and Label Information (Page 2 of 2)

ADVERSE REACTIONS

Postoperative

The following adverse events have been associated with the use of naloxone hydrochloride in postoperative patients: hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, dyspnea, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. Excessive doses of naloxone hydrochloride in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression).

Opioid Depression

Abrupt reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, tremulousness, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death (see PRECAUTIONS).

Opioid Dependence

Abrupt reversal of opioid effects in persons who are physically dependent on opioids may precipitate an acute withdrawal syndrome which may include, but is not limited to, the following signs and symptoms: body aches, fever, sweating, runny nose, sneezing, piloerection, yawning, weakness, shivering or trembling, nervousness, restlessness or irritability, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, abdominal cramps, increased blood pressure, tachycardia. In the neonate, opioid withdrawal may also include: convulsions; excessive crying; hyperactive reflexes (see WARNINGS).
Adverse events associated with the postoperative use of naloxone hydrochloride are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows:

Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events.
Gastrointestinal Disorders:vomiting, nausea
Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion
Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness
Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders:dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia
Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders:nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating
Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing.

See also PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults; Postoperative Opioid Depression.

Postoperative
The following adverse events have been associated with the use of naloxone hydrochloride in postoperative patients: hypotension, hypertension, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, dyspnea, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events. Excessive doses of naloxone hydrochloride in postoperative patients may result in significant reversal of analgesia and may cause agitation (see PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults-Postoperative Opioid Depression).

Opioid Depression
Abrupt reversal of opioid depression may result in nausea, vomiting, sweating, tachycardia, increased blood pressure, tremulousness, seizures, ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation, pulmonary edema, and cardiac arrest which may result in death (see PRECAUTIONS).

Opioid Dependence
Abrupt reversal of opioid effects in persons who are physically dependent on opioids may precipitate an acute withdrawal syndrome which may include, but is not limited to, the following signs and symptoms: body aches, fever, sweating, runny nose, sneezing, piloerection, yawning, weakness, shivering or trembling, nervousness, restlessness or irritability, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, abdominal cramps, increased blood pressure, tachycardia. In the neonate, opioid withdrawal may also include: convulsions; excessive crying; hyperactive reflexes (see WARNINGS).

Adverse events associated with the postoperative use of naloxone hydrochloride are listed by organ system and in decreasing order of frequency as follows:

Cardiac Disorders: pulmonary edema, cardiac arrest or failure, tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, and ventricular tachycardia. Death, coma, and encephalopathy have been reported as sequelae of these events.

Gastrointestinal Disorders: vomiting, nausea

Nervous System Disorders: convulsions, paraesthesia, grand mal convulsion

Psychiatric Disorders: agitation, hallucination, tremulousness

Respiratory, Thoracic and Mediastinal Disorders: dyspnea, respiratory depression, hypoxia

Skin and Subcutaneous Tissue Disorders: nonspecific injection site reactions, sweating

Vascular Disorders: hypertension, hypotension, hot flushes or flushing

See also PRECAUTIONS and DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION; Usage in Adults; Postoperative Opioid Depression.

DRUG ABUSE AND DEPENDENCE

Naloxone hydrochloride is an opioid antagonist. Physical dependence associated with the use of naloxone hydrochloride has not been reported. Tolerance to the opioid antagonist effect of naloxone hydrochloride is not known to occur.

OVERDOSAGE

There is limited clinical experience with naloxone hydrochloride overdosage in humans.

Adult Patients

In one small study, volunteers who received 24 mg/70 kg did not demonstrate toxicity. In another study, 36 patients with acute stroke received a loading dose of 4 mg/kg (10 mg/m2/min) of naloxone hydrochloride followed immediately by 2 mg/kg/hr for 24 hours. Twenty-three patients experienced adverse events associated with naloxone use, and naloxone was discontinued in seven patients because of adverse effects. The most serious adverse events were: seizures (2 patients), severe hypertension (1), and hypotension and/or bradycardia (3).

At doses of 2 mg/kg in normal subjects, cognitive impairment and behavioral symptoms, including irritability, anxiety, tension, suspiciousness, sadness, difficulty concentrating, and lack of appetite have been reported. In addition, somatic symptoms, including dizziness, heaviness, sweating, nausea, and stomachaches were also reported. Although complete information is not available, behavioral symptoms were reported to often persist for 2-3 days.

Pediatric Patients

Up to 11 doses of 0.2 mg of naloxone (2.2 mg) have been administered to children following overdose of diphenoxylate hydrochloride with atropine sulfate. Pediatric reports include a 2-1/2 year-old child who inadvertently received a dose of 20 mg of naloxone for treatment of respiratory depression following overdose with diphenoxylate hydrochloride with atropine sulfate. The child responded well and recovered without adverse sequelae. There is also a report of a 4-1/2 year-old child who received 11 doses during a 12-hour period, with no adverse sequelae.

Patient Management

Patients who experience a naloxone hydrochloride overdose should be treated symptomatically in a closely supervised environment.

Physicians should contact a poison control center for the most up-to-date patient management information.

Adult Patients
In one small study, volunteers who received 24 mg/70 kg did not demonstrate toxicity. In another study, 36 patients with acute stroke received a loading dose of 4 mg/kg (10 mg/m2/min) of naloxone hydrochloride followed immediately by 2 mg/kg/hr for 24 hours. Twenty-three patients experienced adverse events associated with naloxone use, and naloxone was discontinued in seven patients because of adverse effects. The most serious adverse events were: seizures (2 patients), severe hypertension (1), and hypotension and/or bradycardia (3).

At doses of 2 mg/kg in normal subjects, cognitive impairment and behavioral symptoms, including irritability, anxiety, tension, suspiciousness, sadness, difficulty concentrating, and lack of appetite have been reported. In addition, somatic symptoms, including dizziness, heaviness, sweating, nausea, and stomachaches were also reported. Although complete information is not available, behavioral symptoms were reported to often persist for 2-3 days.

Pediatric Patients
Up to 11 doses of 0.2 mg of naloxone (2.2 mg) have been administered to children following overdose of diphenoxylate hydrochloride with atropine sulfate. Pediatric reports include a 2-1/2 year old child who inadvertently received a dose of 20 mg of naloxone for treatment of respiratory depression following overdose with diphenoxylate hydrochloride with atropine sulfate. The child responded well and recovered without adverse sequelae. There is also a report of a 4-1/2 year old child who received 11 doses during a 12-hour period, with no adverse sequelae.

Patient Management
Patients who experience a naloxone hydrochloride overdose should be treated symptomatically in a closely supervised environment. Physicians should contact a poison control center for the most up-to-date patient management information.

DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION

Naloxone hydrochloride injection may be administered intravenously, intramuscularly, or subcutaneously. The most rapid onset of action is achieved by intravenous administration, which is recommended in emergency situations.

Since the duration of action of some opioids may exceed that of naloxone, the patient should be kept under continued surveillance. Repeated doses of naloxone should be administered, as necessary.

Intravenous Infusion

Naloxone hydrochloride injection may be diluted for intravenous infusion in normal saline or 5% dextrose solutions. The addition of 2 mg of naloxone in 500 mL of either solution provides a concentration of 0.004 mg/mL. Mixtures should be used within 24 hours. After 24 hours, the remaining unused mixture must be discarded. The rate of administration should be titrated in accordance with the patient’s response.
Naloxone hydrochloride injection should not be mixed with preparations containing bisulfite, metabisulfite, long-chain or high molecular weight anions, or any solution having an alkaline pH. No drug or chemical agent should be added to naloxone hydrochloride injection unless its effect on the chemical and physical stability of the solution has first been established.

General

Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit.

Usage in Adults

Opioid Overdose—Known or Suspected: An initial dose of 0.4 mg to 2 mg of naloxone hydrochloride may be administered intravenously. If the desired degree of counteraction and improvement in respiratory functions are not obtained, it may be repeated at two-to-three-minute intervals. If no response is observed after 10 mg of naloxone hydrochloride have been administered, the diagnosis of opioid-induced or partial opioid-induced toxicity should be questioned. Intramuscular or subcutaneous administration may be necessary if the intravenous route is not available.

Postoperative Opioid Depression: For the partial reversal of opioid depression following the use of opioids during surgery, smaller doses of naloxone hydrochloride are usually sufficient. The dose of naloxone hydrochloride should be titrated according to the patient’s response. For the initial reversal of respiratory depression, naloxone hydrochloride should be injected in increments of 0.1 to 0.2 mg intravenously at two-to three-minute intervals to the desired degree of reversal—i.e., adequate ventilationand alertness without significant pain or discomfort. Larger than necessary dosage of naloxone may result in significant reversal of analgesia and increase in blood pressure. Similarly, too rapid reversal may induce nausea, vomiting, sweating, or circulatory stress.
Repeat doses of naloxone may be required within one- to two-hour intervals depending upon the amount, type (i.e., short or long acting) and time interval since last administration of opioid. Supplemental intramuscular doses have been shown to produce a longer lasting effect.

Septic Shock:The optimal dosage of naloxone hydrochloride or duration of therapy for the treatment of hypotension in septic shock patients has not been established (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY).

Usage in Children

Opioid Overdose—Known or Suspected:The usual initial dose in children is 0.01 mg/kg body weight given I.V. If this dose does not result in the desired degree of clinical improvement, a subsequent dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight may be administered. If an l.V. route of administration is not available, naloxone may be administered I.M. or S.C. in divided doses. If necessary, naloxone hydrochloride injection can be diluted with sterile water for injection.

Postoperative Opioid Depression: Follow the recommendations and cautions under Adult Postoperative Depression. For the initial reversal of respiratory depression naloxone hydrochloride should be injected in increments of 0.005 mg to 0.01 mg intravenously at two- to three-minute intervals to the desired degree of reversal.

Usage in Neonates
Opioid-lnduced Depression: The usual initial dose is 0.01 mg/kg body weight administered I.V., I.M., or S.C. This dose may be repeated in accordance with adult administration guidelines for postoperative opioid depression.

Intravenous Infusion
Naloxone hydrochloride injection may be diluted for intravenous infusion in normal saline or 5% dextrose solutions. The addition of 2 mg of naloxone in 500 mL of either solution provides a concentration of 0.004 mg/mL. Mixtures should be used within 24 hours. After 24 hours, the remaining unused mixture must be discarded. The rate of administration should be titrated in accoreance with the patient’s response.

Naloxone hydrochloride injection should not be mixed with preparations containing bisulfite, metabisulfite, long-chain or high molecular weight anions, or any solution having an alkaline pH. No drug or chemcial agent should be added to naloxone hydrochloride injection unless its effect on the chemical and physical stability of the solution has first been established.

General
Parenteral drug products should be inspected visually for particulate matter and discoloration prior to administration whenever solution and container permit.

Usage in Adults
Opioid Overdose-Known or Suspected: An initial dose of 0.4 mg to 2 mg of naloxone hydrochloride may be administered intravenously. If the desired degree of counteraction and improvement in respiratory functions are not obtained, it may be repeated at two-three-minute intervals. If no response is observed after 10 mg of naloxone hydrochloride have been administered, the diagnosis of opioid-induced or partial opioid-induced toxicity should be questioned. Intramuscular or subcutaneous adminstration may be necessary if the intravenous route is not available.

Postoperative Opioid Depression:

For the partial reversal of opioid depression following the use of opioids during surgery, smaller doses of naloxone hydrochlroide are usually sufficient. The dose of naloxone hydrochloride should be titrated according to the patient’s response. For the initial reversal of respiratory depression, naloxone hydrochloride should be injected in increments of 0.1 to 0.2 mg intravenously at two-to-three-minute intervals to the desired degree of reversal-i.e., adequate ventilation and alertness without significant pain or discomfor. Larger than necessary dosage of naloxone may result in significant reversal of analgesia and increase in blood pressure. Similarly, too rapid reversal may induce nausea, vomiting, sweatin, or circulatory stress.

Repeat doses of naloxone may be required within on- to two-hour intervals depending upon the amount, type (i.e., short or long acting) and time interval since last administration of opioid. Supplemental intramuscular doses have been shown to produce a longer lasting effect.

Septic Shock:

The optimal dosage of naloxone hydrochloride or duration of therapy for the treatment of hypotension in septic shock patients has not been established (see CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY).

Usage in Children
Opioid Overdose-Known or Suspected: The usual initial dose in children is 0.01 mg/kg body weight given I.V. If this dose does not result in the desired degree of clinical improvement, a subsequent dose of 0.1 mg/kg body weight may be administered. If an I.V. route of administration is not available, naloxone may be administered I.M. or S.C. in divided doses. If necessary, naloxone hydrochloride injection can be diluted with sterile water for injection.

Postoperative Opioid Depression:

Follow the recommendations and cautions under Adult Postoperative Depression. For the initial reversal of respiratory depression naloxone hydrochloride should be injected in increments of 0.005 mg to 0.01 mg intravenously at two- to three-minute intervals to the desired degree of reversal.

Usage in NeonatesOpioid-Induced Depression: The usual initial dose is 0.01 mg/kg body weight administered I.V., I.M., or S.C. This dose may be repeated in accordance with adult administration guidelines for postoperative opioid depression.

HOW SUPPLIED

1 mg/mL naloxone hydrochloride injection USP, for intravenous, intramuscular and subcutaneous administration.

Available as follows:

1 mg/mL

2 mL single dose disposable prefilled syringes, in the MIN-I-JET® system with 21 G. x 11/2” needle. Shrink Wrapped Packages of 10.

NDC 76329-1469-1 Stock No. 1469 (contains no preservative)

2 mL single dose disposable Luer-JetTM Luer-Lock Prefilled Syringe. Shrink Wrapped Packages of 10.

NDC 76329-3369-1 Stock No. 3369 (contains no preservative)

Syringe Assembly Directions:

The MIN-I-JET® syringe with needle, illustrated below, is the basic unit upon which all the other syringe systems are built; slight adaptations and/ or additional auxiliary parts create the other syringe systems. Assembly directions remain essentially the same.

USE ASEPTIC TECHNIQUE

Do not assemble until ready to use.

//druginserts.com/lib/images-rx/naloxone-hydrochloride-16/image1-300x122.jpg
(click image for full-size original)

SPL UNCLASSIFIED

Store at 25˚C (77˚F); excursions permitted to 15˚-30˚C (59˚-86˚F). [See USP Controlled Room Temperature.]
Protect from light.
Store in carton until contents have been used.

INTERNATIONAL MEDICATION SYSTEMS, LIMITEDSO. EL MONTE, CA 91733, U.S.A. REV. 11-13

An Amphastar Pharmaceuticals Company

© INTERNATIONAL MEDICATION SYSTEMS, LIMITED 2013

SAMPLE PACKAGE LABEL

//druginserts.com/lib/images-rx/naloxone-hydrochloride-16/label1-300x274.jpg
(click image for full-size original)

NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE naloxone hydrochloride injection
Product Information
Product Type HUMAN PRESCRIPTION DRUG Item Code (Source) NDC:52584-978(NDC:76329-1469)
Route of Administration PARENTERAL DEA Schedule
Active Ingredient/Active Moiety
Ingredient Name Basis of Strength Strength
NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE (NALOXONE) NALOXONE HYDROCHLORIDE 1 mg in 1 mL
Packaging
# Item Code Package Description Multilevel Packaging
1 NDC:52584-978-01 1 BOX in 1 BAG contains a BOX
1 1 SYRINGE in 1 BOX This package is contained within the BAG (52584-978-01) and contains a SYRINGE
1 2 mL in 1 SYRINGE This package is contained within a BOX and a BAG (52584-978-01)
Marketing Information
Marketing Category Application Number or Monograph Citation Marketing Start Date Marketing End Date
ANDA ANDA072076 12/06/2013
Labeler — General Injectables & Vaccines, Inc (108250663)

Revised: 11/2021 General Injectables & Vaccines, Inc

Page 2 of 2 1 2

DrugInserts.com provides trustworthy package insert and label information about marketed drugs as submitted by manufacturers to the US Food and Drug Administration. Package information is not reviewed or updated separately by DrugInserts.com. Every individual package label entry contains a unique identifier which can be used to secure further details directly from the US National Institutes of Health and/or the FDA.

As the leading independent provider of trustworthy medication information, we source our database directly from the FDA's central repository of drug labels and package inserts under the Structured Product Labeling standard. Our material is not intended as a substitute for direct consultation with a qualified health professional.

Terms of Use | Copyright © 2021. All Rights Reserved.