Galantamine: Package Insert and Label Information (Page 3 of 4)

13 NON-CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY

13.1 Carcinogenesis, Mutagenesis, Impairment of Fertility

Carcinogenesis

In a 24-month oral carcinogenicity study in rats, an increase in endometrial adenocarcinomas was observed at 10 mg/kg/day (4 times the MRHD of 24 mg/day on a mg/m2 basis or 6 times on a plasma exposure [AUC] basis) and 30 mg/kg/day (12 times MRHD on a mg/m2 basis or 19 times on an AUC basis). No increase in neoplastic changes was observed in females at 2.5 mg/kg/day (equivalent to the MRHD on a mg/m2 basis or 2 times on an AUC basis) or in males up to the highest dose tested of 30 mg/kg/day (12 times the MRHD on a mg/m2 and AUC basis).
Galantamine was not carcinogenic in a 6-month carcinogenicity study in transgenic (P 53-deficient) mice at oral doses up to 20 mg/kg/day, or in a 24-month carcinogenicity study in mice at oral doses up to 10 mg/kg/day (equivalent to the MRHD on a plasma AUC basis).
Mutagenesis

Galantamine was negative in a battery of in vitro (bacterial reverse mutation, mouse lymphoma tk , and chromosomal aberration in mammalian cells) and in vivo (mouse micronucleus) genotoxicity assays.
Impairment of Fertility

No impairment of fertility was seen in rats given up to 16 mg/kg/day (7 times the MRHD on a mg/m2 basis) for 14 days prior to mating in females and for 60 days prior to mating in males.

14 CLINICAL STUDIES

The effectiveness of galantamine as a treatment for Alzheimer’s disease is demonstrated by the results of 5 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical investigations in patients with probable Alzheimer’s disease, 4 with the immediate-release tablet and 1 with the extended-release capsule [diagnosed by NINCDS-ADRDA criteria, with Mini-Mental State Examination scores that were ≥10 and ≤24]. Doses studied with the tablet formulation were 8 to 32 mg/day given as twice daily doses. In 3 of the 4 studies with the tablet, patients were started on a low dose of 8 mg, then titrated weekly by 8 mg/day to 24 or 32 mg as assigned. In the fourth study (USA 4-week Dose Escalation Fixed-Dose Study) dose escalation of 8 mg/day occurred over 4-week intervals. The mean age of patients participating in these 4 galantamine trials was 75 years with a range of 41 to 100. Approximately 62% of patients were women and 38% were men. The racial distribution was White 94%, Black 3% and other races 3%. Two other studies examined a three times daily dosing regimen; these also showed or suggested benefit but did not suggest an advantage over twice daily dosing.

14.1 Study Outcome Measures

In each study, the primary effectiveness of galantamine was evaluated using a dual outcome assessment strategy as measured by the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog) and the Clinician’s Interview Based Impression of Change that required the use of caregiver information (CIBIC-plus).
The ability of galantamine to improve cognitive performance was assessed with the cognitive sub-scale of the Alzheimer’s Disease Assessment Scale (ADAS-cog), a multi-item instrument that has been extensively validated in longitudinal cohorts of Alzheimer’s disease patients. The ADAS-cog examines selected aspects of cognitive performance including elements of memory, orientation, attention, reasoning, language and praxis. The ADAS-cog scoring range is from 0 to 70, with higher scores indicating greater cognitive impairment. Elderly normal adults may score as low as 0 or 1, but it is not unusual for non-demented adults to score slightly higher.
The patients recruited as participants in each study using the tablet formulation had mean scores on ADAS-cog of approximately 27 units, with a range from 5 to 69. Experience gained in longitudinal studies of ambulatory patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease suggests that they gain 6 to 12 units a year on the ADAS-cog. Lesser degrees of change, however, are seen in patients with very mild or very advanced disease because the ADAS-cog is not uniformly sensitive to change over the course of the disease. The annualized rate of decline in the placebo patients participating in galantamine trials was approximately 4.5 units per year.
The ability of galantamine to produce an overall clinical effect was assessed using a Clinician’s Interview Based Impression of Change that required the use of caregiver information, the CIBIC-plus. The CIBIC-plus is not a single instrument and is not a standardized instrument like the ADAS-cog. Clinical trials for investigational drugs have used a variety of CIBIC formats, each different in terms of depth and structure. As such, results from a CIBIC-plus reflect clinical experience from the trial or trials in which it was used and cannot be compared directly with the results of CIBIC-plus evaluations from other clinical trials. The CIBIC-plus used in the trials was a semi-structured instrument based on a comprehensive evaluation at baseline and subsequent time-points of 4 major areas of patient function: general, cognitive, behavioral and activities of daily living. It represents the assessment of a skilled clinician based on his/her observation at an interview with the patient, in combination with information supplied by a caregiver familiar with the behavior of the patient over the interval rated. The CIBIC-plus is scored as a seven-point categorical rating, ranging from a score of 1, indicating “markedly improved,” to a score of 4, indicating “no change” to a score of 7, indicating “marked worsening.” The CIBIC-plus has not been systematically compared directly to assessments not using information from caregivers (CIBIC) or other global methods.

14.2 Immediate-Release Tablets

U.S. Twenty-One Week Fixed-Dose Study
In a study of 21 weeks duration, 978 patients were randomized to doses of 8, 16, or 24 mg of galantamine per day, or to placebo, each given in 2 divided doses. Treatment was initiated at 8 mg/day for all patients randomized to galantamine and increased by 8 mg/day every 4 weeks. Therefore, the maximum titration phase was 8 weeks and the minimum maintenance phase was 13 weeks (in patients randomized to 24 mg/day of galantamine).

Effects on the ADAS-cog

Figure 1 illustrates the time course for the change from baseline in ADAS-cog scores for all four dose groups over the 21 weeks of the study. At 21 weeks of treatment, the mean differences in the ADAS-cog change scores for the galantamine-treated patients compared to the patients on placebo were 1.7, 3.3, and 3.6 units for the 8, 16 and 24 mg/day treatments, respectively. The 16 mg/day and 24 mg/day treatments were statistically significantly superior to placebo and to the 8 mg/day treatment. There was no statistically significant difference between the 16 mg/day and 24 mg/day dose groups.
Figure 1: Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 21 Weeks (5 Months) of Treatment

Figure 1: Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 21 Weeks (5 Months) of Treatment
(click image for full-size original)


Figure 2 illustrates the cumulative percentages of patients from each of the four treatment groups who had attained at least the measure of improvement in ADAS-cog score shown on the X-axis. Three change scores (10-point, 7-point and 4-point reductions) and no change in score from baseline have been identified for illustrative purposes, and the percent of patients in each group achieving that result is shown in the inset table.
The curves demonstrate that both patients assigned to galantamine and placebo have a wide range of responses, but that the galantamine groups are more likely to show the greater improvements.
Figure 2: Cumulative Percentage of Patients Completing 21 Weeks of Double-Blind Treatment With Specified Changes From Baseline in ADAS-cog Scores. The Percentages of Randomized Patients Who Completed the Study Were: Placebo 84%, 8 mg/day 77%, 16 mg/day 78% and 24 mg/day 78%.
Figure 2: Cumulative Percentage of Patients Completing 21 Weeks of Double-Blind Treatment With Specified Changes From Baseline in ADAS-cog Scores. The Percentages of Randomized Patients Who Completed the Study Were: Placebo 84%, 8 mg/day 77%, 16 mg/day 78% and 24 mg/day 78%.
(click image for full-size original)

Change in ADAS-cog
Treatment -10 -7 -4 -0
Placebo3.6%7.6%19.6%41.8%
8 mg/day5.9%13.9%25.7%46.5%
16 mg/day7.2%15.9%35.6%65.4%
24 mg/day10.4%22.3%37%64.9%

Effects on the CIBIC-plus

Figure 3 is a histogram of the percentage distribution of CIBIC-plus scores attained by patients assigned to each of the four treatment groups who completed 21 weeks of treatment. The galantamine-placebo differences for these groups of patients in mean rating were 0.15, 0.41 and 0.44 units for the 8, 16 and 24 mg/day treatments, respectively. The 16 mg/day and 24 mg/day treatments were statistically significantly superior to placebo. The differences vs. the 8 mg/day treatment for the 16 and 24 mg/day treatments were 0.26 and 0.29, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the 16 mg/day and 24 mg/day dose groups.
Figure 3: Distribution of CIBIC-plus Ratings at Week 21

Figure 3: Distribution of CIBIC-plus Ratings at Week 21
(click image for full-size original)


U.S. Twenty-Six Week Fixed-Dose Study
In a study of 26 weeks duration, 636 patients were randomized to either a dose of 24 mg or 32 mg of galantamine per day, or to placebo, each given in two divided doses. The 26-week study was divided into a 3-week dose titration phase and a 23-week maintenance phase.

Effects on the ADAS-cog

Figure 4 illustrates the time course for the change from baseline in ADAS-cog scores for all three dose groups over the 26 weeks of the study. At 26 weeks of treatment, the mean differences in the ADAS-cog change scores for the galantamine-treated patients compared to the patients on placebo were 3.9 and 3.8 units for the 24 mg/day and 32 mg/day treatments, respectively. Both treatments were statistically significantly superior to placebo but were not significantly different from each other.
F igure 4: Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 26 Weeks of Treatment
Figure 4:	Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 26 Weeks of Treatment
(click image for full-size original)

Figure 5 illustrates the cumulative percentages of patients from each of the three treatment groups who had attained at least the measure of improvement in ADAS-cog score shown on the X-axis. Three change scores (10-point, 7-point and 4-point reductions) and no change in score from baseline have been identified for illustrative purposes, and the percent of patients in each group achieving that result is shown in the inset table. The curves demonstrate that both patients assigned to galantamine and placebo have a wide range of responses, but that the galantamine groups are more likely to show the greater improvements. A curve for an effective treatment would be shifted to the left of the curve for placebo, while an ineffective or deleterious treatment would be superimposed upon or shifted to the right of the curve for placebo, respectively.

Change in ADAS-cog
Treatment -10 -7 -4 -0
Placebo2.1%5.7%16.6 %43.9%
24 mg/day7.6%18.3%33.6%64.1%
32 mg/day11.1%19.7%33.3%58.1%


Figure 5: C umulative Percentage of Patients Completing 26 Weeks of Double-Blind Treatment With Specified Changes From Baseline in ADAS-cog Scores. The Percentages of Randomized Patients Who Completed the Study Were: Placebo 81%, 24 mg/day 68%, and 32 mg/day 58%.

FIGURE 5
(click image for full-size original)

Effects on the CIBIC-plus

Figure 6 is a histogram of the percentage distribution of CIBIC-plus scores attained by patients assigned to each of the three treatment groups who completed 26 weeks of treatment. The mean galantamine-placebo differences for these groups of patients in the mean rating were 0.28 and 0.29 units for 24 and 32 mg/day of galantamine, respectively. The mean ratings for both groups were statistically significantly superior to placebo but were not significantly different from each other.
Figure 6: Distribution of CIBIC-plus Ratings at Week 26
Figure 6: Distribution of CIBIC-plus Ratings at Week 26
(click image for full-size original)


International Twenty-Six Week Fixed-Dose Study
In a study of 26 weeks duration identical in design to the USA 26-Week Fixed-Dose Study, 653 patients were randomized to either a dose of 24 mg or 32 mg of galantamine per day, or to placebo, each given in two divided doses. The 26-week study was divided into a 3-week dose titration phase and a 23-week maintenance phase.

Effects on the ADAS-cog

Figure 7 illustrates the time course for the change from baseline in ADAS-cog scores for all three dose groups over the 26 weeks of the study. At 26 weeks of treatment, the mean differences in the ADAS-cog change scores for the galantamine-treated patients compared to the patients on placebo were 3.1 and 4.1 units for the 24 mg/day and 32 mg/day treatments, respectively. Both treatments were statistically significantly superior to placebo but were not significantly different from each other.

Figure 7:Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 26 Weeks of Treatment
Figure 7:         Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 26 Weeks of Treatment
(click image for full-size original)


Figure 8 illustrates the cumulative percentages of patients from each of the three treatment groups who had attained at least the measure of improvement in ADAS-cog score shown on the X-axis. Three change scores (10-point, 7-point and 4-point reductions) and no change in score from baseline have been identified for illustrative purposes, and the percent of patients in each group achieving that result is shown in the inset table.
The curves demonstrate that both patients assigned to galantamine and placebo have a wide range of responses, but that the galantamine groups are more likely to show the greater improvements.

Figure 8: Cumulative Percentage of Patients Completing 26 Weeks of Double-Blind Treatment With Specified Changes From Baseline in ADAS-cog Scores. The Percentages of Randomized Patients Who Completed the Study Were: Placebo 87%, 24 mg/day 80%, and 32 mg/day 75%.
Figure 8:	Cumulative Percentage of Patients Completing 26 Weeks of Double-Blind Treatment With Specified Changes From Baseline in ADAS-cog Scores. The Percentages of Randomized Patients Who Completed the Study Were: Placebo 87%, 24 mg/day 80%, and 32 mg/day 75%.
(click image for full-size original)

Change in ADAS-cog
Treatment -10 -7 -4 -0
Placebo1.2%5.8%15.2%39.8%
24 mg/day4.5%15.4%30.8%65.4%
32 mg/day7.9%19.7%34.9%63.8%

Effects on the CIBIC-plus


Figure 9 is a histogram of the percentage distribution of CIBIC-plus scores attained by patients assigned to each of the three treatment groups who completed 26 weeks of treatment. The mean galantamine-placebo differences for these groups of patients in the mean rating of change from baseline were 0.34 and 0.47 for 24 and 32 mg/day of galantamine respectively. The mean ratings for the galantamine groups were statistically significantly superior to placebo but were not significantly different from each other.
Figure 9: Distribution of CIBIC-plus Rating at Week 26

Figure 9:	Distribution of CIBIC-plus Rating at Week 26
(click image for full-size original)

International Thirteen-Week Flexible-Dose Study
In a study of 13 weeks duration, 386 patients were randomized to either a flexible dose of 24 to 32 mg/day of galantamine or to placebo, each given in two divided doses. The 13-week study was divided into a 3-week dose titration phase and a 10-week maintenance phase. The patients in the active treatment arm of the study were maintained at either 24 mg/day or 32 mg/day at the discretion of the investigator.

Effects on the ADAS-cog

Figure 10 illustrates the time course for the change from baseline in ADAS-cog scores for both dose groups over the 13 weeks of the study. At 13 weeks of treatment, the mean difference in the ADAS-cog change scores for the treated patients compared to the patients on placebo was 1.9. Galantamine at a dose of 24 to 32 mg/day was statistically significantly superior to placebo.

Figure 10: Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 13 Weeks of Treatment

Figure 10:	Time-Course of the Change From Baseline in ADAS-cog Score for Patients Completing 13 Weeks of Treatment
(click image for full-size original)

Figure 11 illustrates the cumulative percentages of patients from each of the two treatment groups who had attained at least the measure of improvement in ADAS-cog score shown on the X-axis. Three change scores (10-point, 7-point and 4-point reductions) and no change in score from baseline have been identified for illustrative purposes, and the percent of patients in each group achieving that result is shown in the inset table.

The curves demonstrate that both patients assigned to galantamine and placebo have a wide range of responses, but that the galantamine group is more likely to show the greater improvement.

Figure 11:Cumulative Percentage of Patients Completing 13 Weeks of Double-Blind Treatment With Specified Changes from Baseline in ADAS-cog Scores. The Percentages of Randomized Patients Who Completed the Study Were: Placebo 90%, 24 to 32 mg/day 67%.

Figure 11:	Cumulative Percentage of Patients Completing 13 Weeks of Double-Blind Treatment With Specified Changes from Baseline in ADAS-cog Scores. The Percentages of Randomized Patients Who Completed the Study Were: Placebo 90%, 24 to 32 mg/day 67%.
(click image for full-size original)

Change in ADAS-cog
Treatment -10 -7 -4 -0
Placebo1.9%5.6%19.4%50%
24 or 32 mg/day7.1%18.8%32.9%65.3%

Effects on the CIBIC-plus

Figure 12 is a histogram of the percentage distribution of CIBIC-plus scores attained by patients assigned to each of the two treatment groups who completed 13 weeks of treatment. The mean galantamine-placebo differences for the group of patients in the mean rating of change from baseline were 0.37 units. The mean rating for the 24 to 32 mg/day group was statistically significantly superior to placebo.
Figure 12: Distribution of CIBIC-plus Ratings at Week 13

FIGURE 12
(click image for full-size original)


Age, Gender and Race

Patient’s age, gender, or race did not predict clinical outcome of treatment.

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